Coping With Depression

Depression is a common condition that can develop either gradually or overnight. Many people who have depression feel low most of the time. But this condition has many symptoms, which can make it difficult to recognise.

Depression is not a sign of personal failure or an inability to cope. Try not to blame yourself or feel guilty. It may not seem like it, but help is available. It is important to remember that depression is common, and that it can usually be treated successfully. The first step to feeling better is finding appropriate help. There are both medical and non-medical approaches to managing depression.

When you have been diagnosed with cancer, you may feel very low at times. This may be at the time of diagnosis, or during or after treatment. For some people, their low mood may continue or get worse, and they may need professional help or treatment.

Sometimes, it can be difficult to know whether you’re depressed or not. It may be other people who notice symptoms and suggest that you might need help.

Depression is a common condition that affects around 1 in 10 people (10%). It can be triggered by a variety of difficult events, including a cancer diagnosis or having treatment for cancer. However, it can also happen by chance or be related to other events that have nothing to do with cancer.

Symptoms of depression include:

  • having a very low mood most of the time
  • feeling fatigued or lacking in energy
  • getting no pleasure out of life or activities you usually enjoy
  • crying a lot, or feeling unable to cry
  • having difficulty concentrating or making decisions
  • being unusually irritable or impatient
  • waking up early, having difficulty sleeping, or sleeping more than usual
  • feeling less affectionate or having a loss of sexual desire
  • hallucinations or hearing voices (although this is rare).

These are just some of the symptoms of depression, but they will be different for each person. If you have other symptoms but think you may be depressed, talk to your doctor or nurse.

to be honest i don’t find the McMillian website particularly helpful, we had the welcome to your ‘tumour pack’ which was a lot of reading not much information.

lets address the symptoms of depression

  • having a very low mood most of the time, if you’ve been told 15-18 months that will give you a low mood if you feel rubbish as well feeling
  • fatigued or lacking in energy – brain tumour and swelling=
  • tired getting no pleasure out of life or activities you usually enjoy, I’m not capable of doing activities i usually enjoy reading- no concentration, 3 out of 4 hems have to be unpicked. more cross stitch has to be unpicked than left in
  • which is why I’ve taken up crochet, no expectations, all new. i like shopping, ebay and amazon have seen a lot of my money 🙂
  • Crying a lot, or feeling unable to cry – loads of crying
  • having difficulty concentrating or making decisions – hello brain tumour/swelling
  • being unusually irritable or impatient-usual state of affairs for me also, side affects of medications waking up early, having difficulty sleeping, or sleeping more than usual – hello brain tumour/swelling feeling less affectionate or having a loss of sexual desire – lets face it when none of your clothes fit and you have chipmunk face you don’t feel very sexy.
  • hallucinations or hearing voices (although this is rare). no hallucinations.i’m pretty  sure I’m not depressed but of course i could be in denial.if you are at the knitting and stitching show 2nd March Olympia, say hello, i’ll be the the one in the wheel chair with the bored looking husband and badly hemmed jeans.

Posted on 19/02/2018, in musings, Olympia knitting and stitching show. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Amigurumi
    Hi
    I’m very crossthat I didn’t find out about amigurumi earlier,they look like fun and don’t take up much room and they can be sent quite easily to charity shops.

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